Painting Animation Take One

So this is an idea that I’ve been wanting to try for a long time.  I think I first took an interest in making an animation from paint after seeing the film Le mystere Picasso by Henri-Georges Clouzot in college.  Right now I feel like I’m testing the waters with this new approach towards the medium, and this is my first shot at it.  The idea of painting each frame has always felt a little overwhelming, and has probably been the main reason I’ve avoided trying it for so long.

I like how the animation can expose the process of painting while also unfolding a narrative.  I’m also interested how in the end there is no object, the painting gets stored in some invisible time lapse which feels less burdensome than paint on a canvas.  I’m not sure how I feel about this entirely.  I love looking at a good painting on canvas for an extended period of time in the right setting, but when they begin to accumulate in the studio, it can turn the studio into a heavy place which can have a negative effect on productivity.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Animations and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Painting Animation Take One

  1. mcalbee says:

    Austin,
    Have you ever seen this short film adaptation of “The Old Man and The Sea” by Alexander Petrov? He paints (using his hands) with oils on glass, and then photographs each frame. I don’t remember exactly how long it took him to complete…but it was a ridiculously long time.

  2. Austin says:

    Wow. That’s some intense dedication, I’m not quite there yet. It’s amazing how smooth the whole thing is. It would be great to see a better quality version – I’d want to see the paint a little more. I’m wondering what the advantage to painting on glass is too. Thanks for sending it along Mary.

  3. Dick Weis says:

    Makes me think of the work by William Kentridge. He is one of my favorites.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s